Laminitis

By Sue Palmer

Laminitis is a devastating condition, as anyone who has watched their horse or pony suffer from it will know. There is much new research around the condition, and the BHS recently wrote a great piece that I wanted to share it contains so much useful information (http://www.bhs.org.uk/welfare-and-care/our-work/recent-research/laminitis?utm_source=All+members+info&utm_campaign=f16af5d863-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_15&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce97b82f97-f16af5d863-205786317).

Especially at this time of year, it is really important to monitor your horses weight. Although laminitis is commonly (90%) an endocrine condition, it can be triggered through excess weight, and spring and autumn are the worst times for this. I have seen my own mare barely able to stand du to toxic laminitis, and I have treated many horses and ponies with the condition, in an effort to help them be more comfortable, if only for a short while. Perhaps consider getting your boss tested for EMS or PPID (see article for more information http://www.bhs.org.uk/welfare-and-care/our-work/recent-research/laminitis?utm_source=All+members+info&utm_campaign=f16af5d863-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_15&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce97b82f97-f16af5d863-205786317) to be able to better assess the risk getting laminitis.

Please take a moment, or actually several minutes, to read this detailed information that the BHS have put together (http://www.bhs.org.uk/welfare-and-care/our-work/recent-research/laminitis?utm_source=All+members+info&utm_campaign=f16af5d863-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_15&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce97b82f97-f16af5d863-205786317), and let’s share the evidenced based knowledge around laminitis, rather than relying on tradition and old wives tales.

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